PROJECT BEACON 

 

Project Beacon was created in Fiscal Year 2016 with the overall aim to bridge the divide between urban Indian centers and American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims of sex trafficking. In it's inaugural year, the program provided funding to three organizations with expertise in meeting the health, safety, and welfare needs of urban Native communities to develop the capacity of these organizations to provide direct services to urban AI/AN victims of sex trafficking.

 

In FY 2019, the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) expanded Project Beacon by making awards under two purpose areas; Purpose Area 1 - Direct Services and Purpose Area 2 - Training and Technical Assistance. The aim of FY19 Project Beacon is to increase the quantity and quality of holistic, victim-centered services currently available to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims of sex trafficking who reside in urban areas. Project Beacon is meant to help bridge the divide between urban Indian centers and AI/AN victims of sex trafficking and nonprofit, nongovernmental programs that serve American Indians and Alaska Natives, Project Beacon aims to provide these victims with access to services that meet their cultural, linguistic, and spiritual needs. The Minnesota Indian Women's Sexual Assault Coalition (MIWSAC) is the current technical assistance provider for Project Beacon.  

The Beacon Project uses a Comprehensive Services Model with Four Components:

 

Helvetica Light is an easy-to-read font, with tall and narrow letters, that works well on almost every site.

 

Collaborative Partnerships

Adoption of a Victim-Centered Approach to Service Delivery

Intensive Case Management Services

Specific Required Categories of Victim Services

Key Aspects of Victim-Centered Approach to Service Delivery

  • Trauma-informed approach to provision of services

  • Individualized service plans

  • Educating sex trafficking victims about their options

There are currently five sites funded under FY19 Project Beacon:

The Missoula Project Beacon is a grant-funded initiative that aims to create a network of trauma-informed providers and services that are available to American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) survivors of human trafficking. Our objective is to enhance the quality and quantity of services available to assist urban AIAN survivors of sex trafficking while also educating our partner organizations and the Missoula community as a whole on culturally-appropriate ways to address human trafficking.

As the first and only initiative in Western Montana aimed specifically at assisting urban AIAN human trafficking survivors, Project Beacon hopes to bring healing and resiliency opportunities to our Indigenous communities. Together with our partner agencies, we seek to advocate for our stolen sisters and brothers, train our community on how to spot indicators of trafficking, and bring our community together to offer a space of holistic wellness.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook

First Nations Community Health Source (FNCH) is New Mexico's Title V Urban Health Center, providing culturally competent comprehensive medical, dental, and behavioral healthcare to the 55,000 American Indians and Alaska Natives who reside in the City of Albuquerque. Since 1972 FNCH has offered consumer-driven healthcare and community health programming that promotes a holistic approach to wellness by integrating traditional American Indian, spiritual, cultural, and healing practices with Western medicine and evidence-based interventions. FNCHs current menu of community health offerings include: a homelessness outreach initiative; Diabetes and HIV prevention programming; a youth mentoring program; a supportive housing assistance program; social services case management; a Women's Infants and Children (WIC) program; and assistance with Medicaid enrollment. FNCH received a Project Beacon award in FY 2016 which it used to create its Education and Advocacy for Sex Trafficking Victims (EAST) program.

  • Facebook

The Gerald L. Ignace Health Center (GLIHC) is a 501 (c)(3) healthcare facility that provides healthcare to the estimated 18,239 American Indians and Alaska Natives who reside in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Founded in 1999, GLIHC offers comprehensive primary care, mental health and substance abuse counseling, preventive care, women's health programming, prenatal care, and access to traditional cultural activities that promote wellness, such as a Native Wellness Garden, talking circles, drumming groups, and language classes. GLIHC also features an on-site dental clinic and pharmacy.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
nuihc_logo_lg.png

The Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition (NUIHC) is a 501(c)(3) healthcare organization that serves American Indians and Alaska Natives who reside in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska, and Sioux City and Council Bluffs, Iowa. Founded in 1986, NUIHC currently operates a licensed and accredited primary healthcare clinic, inpatient substance abuse program, and community health programs designed to prevent substance abuse and suicide, and a meal and socialization program for elders.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Friendship House Association of American Indians (FHAAI) is a 501 (c)(3) organization in San Francisco, CA that was founded in 1963 to meet the needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives who were relocated to the San Francisco Bay area during the federal termination era. FHAAI continues to provide essential services to members of Bay area's estimated 22,000 American Indians and Alaska Natives. FHAAI currently operates an 80-bed, licensed and accredited, residential substance abuse treatment program where Native American adults can stay for up to 180 days and participate in culturally appropriate and trauma-informed individual, group, and family therapy, and also access traditional healing practices. FHAAI also operates a smaller, specialized residential substance abuse treatment program for expectant mothers and mothers of children age 0-5. Additionally, FHAAI supports a youth center, where Native youth can access academic enrichment activities, receive college counseling, and participate in cultural activities including classes on drumming, beadwork and regalia making, and pow wow dancing.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
logo-color-short (1).jpg

The Minnesota Indian Women's Sexual Assault Coalition (MIWSAC) is a 501(c)(3) tribal sexual assault

coalition based in Saint Paul, Minnesota. MIWSAC was founded in 2001 with a grant from the Office on Violence

Against Women's Tribal Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition Program, and for nearly 20 years,

has focused on developing the capacity of tribal communities to meet the needs of American Indian and Alaska

Native victims of all forms of sexual violence, including sex trafficking, by incorporating traditional cultural and spiritual practices into the response to these crimes. MIWSAC's work has focused on coordinating and promoting appropriate systemic responses to sexual violence committed against Native women in the State of Minnesota, as well as providing training and technical assistance to a national audience of tribes, and urban tribal nonprofits on topics related to sexual assault and sex trafficking. Additionally, MIWSAC's staff served as co-principal investigators in a ground-breaking research study on sex trafficking and prostitution involving urban American Indian and Alaska Native women in Minnesota, that has served as the basis for much of their training and technical assistance work designed to build the capacity of tribal governments and nonprofit organizations to provide trauma-informed, victim-centered services to Native victims of sex trafficking.

MIWSAC, and its collaborative partner, the Tribal Law and Policy Institute, will provide day-to-day oversight and coordinate all project activities; plan and conduct an annual training and technical assistance assessment and develop a customized training and technical assistance plan for each Project Beacon grantee; plan and conduct an annual two-day grantee meeting for the Project Beacon grantees, as well as monthly webinars on topics related to developing the grantees' capacity to coordinate the provision of comprehensive services for American Indian and Alaska Native victims of sex trafficking; plan and conduct an annual two-day, on-site training and technical assistance visit for each Project Beacon direct services grantee; and assist each Project Beacon direct services grantee with completing its required award deliverables.

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) is a Native American operated non-profit. TLPI is dedicated to

providing free publication resources, comprehensive training, and technical assistance for Native nations and

tribal justice systems in pursuit of our vision to empower Native communities to create and control their own

institutions for the benefit of all community members, now, and for future generations. TLPI assists MIWSAC in

providing technical assistance to Project Beacon grantees. 

Under Project Beacon, TLPI participates in monthly grantee calls, provides any needed technical assistance during those calls in the form of information, announcements, answering any questions and providing available resources. TLPI has also provided live webinars and trainings to Project Beacon on the following topics: Intersection of Sexual Assault and Sex Trafficking, Sustainability, Sex Trafficking in Indian Country: Advocacy Curriculum, Privacy, and Complexities and System Interactions.

 

TLPI Sex Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance 

TLPI is please to offer the following publications, resources, and technical assistance addressing issues on sex trafficking as it impacts Native people and Indian Country. TLPI is also able to offer resources, templates, and written materials such as fact sheets, indicator lists, screening tool samples, and brochures related to sex trafficking for various disciplines such as law enforcement or advocates. TLPI also has the Sex Trafficking in Indian Country: Advocacy Curriculum available as a resource. If there is something specific that TLPI is not able to respond to internally, we can outreach to our partners and consultants to address any other questions, concerns, or information requests. 

I

MIWSAC - 40 Hour Sexual Assault AdvocacyTraining
MIWSAC - 40 Hour Sexual Assault AdvocacyTraining

This training is FREE, in person, and open to all who are interested in advocacy and supporting Indigenous survivors. Our Native-focused, 40-Hour Sexual Assault Advocacy Curriculum was created by Native women experts in the field. It is designed for Tribal communities, and non-Native service providers working with and for Native people who have been impacted by sexual violence.

press to zoom
Published September 2016
Published September 2016

TLPI is pleased to announce the release of a resource, titled "Sex Trafficking In Indian Country: Victim/Survivor Resource Book." Follow the link to learn more and download the resource.

press to zoom
MIWSAC - 40 Hour Sexual Assault AdvocacyTraining
MIWSAC - 40 Hour Sexual Assault AdvocacyTraining

This training is FREE, in person, and open to all who are interested in advocacy and supporting Indigenous survivors. Our Native-focused, 40-Hour Sexual Assault Advocacy Curriculum was created by Native women experts in the field. It is designed for Tribal communities, and non-Native service providers working with and for Native people who have been impacted by sexual violence.

press to zoom
1/2